Today is better  

Posted by Tony Guerrero



Whenever I talk about my kids, people say, "Cherish these days, they go by so fast."

And I do. I get it.

But still, I marvel at my kids more every day, and seriously, I love them more every day. So, while I do cherish who they are today, and while I do miss some aspects of their yesterdays, the truth is, I can't wait until tomorrow! I can't wait to appreciate them more, be amazed by them more, marvel at them more...love them more.

I'm not trying to rush anything. And thankfully, God controls the clock, not me, so there is enough time every day - every moment - to love and appreciate them in the moment. And plenty of time to reminisce.

But like the song says, "I love you more today than yesterday, but not as much as tomorrow."

I wouldn't trade today with my kids for all the yesterdays in the world.

The results are in...  

Posted by Tony Guerrero

The results of the poll:

As often as possible-40%
Only when you have something "important" to add-30%
Everyday -10%
Whenever you feel like it, even if its weeks/months between-10%
Never, its a narcissistic waste of time-10%
Large readership: Often / Less readership: not as necessary-0%

How do you blog?  

Posted by Tony Guerrero

So, I go through spurts of blog activity, and then nothing. I notice this is true for others as well, but there are those who manage to blog everyday, sometimes multiple times a day. I find myself feeling guilty for not blogging, because if even one person made the effort to check my blog, I feel as if I should have done something for them.

So, my little poll:

57 Books  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


When it came time to clear out my nightstand, I realized just what a reading frenzy I'd been in. I read 57 books in about a year - definitely a record for me. I usually read to go to sleep at night - I have to go into other worlds so my mind will stop racing about my own!

Rather than me just storing these books in my garage, why don't you scroll through and see if you want to borrow any?

---------------------------------------------
BIOGRAPHIES
---------------------------------------------
1. GASPIPE
The story of Anthony Casso, one of the Mafia’s leading hitmen. Chilling.
2. FEVER
The story of jazz singer Peggy Lee.
3. SLASH
The autobiography of Guns’N’Roses guitarist Slash.
4. THE CHRIS FARLEY SHOW
The very tragic tale of Saturday Night Live comedian Chris Farley.
5. THE GOOD LIFE
Jazz Singer Tony Bennett’s autobiography.
6. MAKING RECORDS
Legendary record producer Phil Ramone recalls his many studio experiences.
7. THE LOUIS ARMSTRONG COMPANION
Most books on Louis are fascinating because he was fascinating.
8. YOU’RE LUCKY YOU’RE FUNNY
By the producer of Everyone Loves Raymond.
9. BORN STANDING UP
Actor/Comedian Steve Martin’s autobiography. Lots of fun revelations for his fans. Very well done.
10. MOUSE IN THE RAT PACK
Joey Bishop was one of Sinatra’s “Rat-Pack”. A classic comedian who maybe wasn’t as ‘cool’ as the rest of the pack, but helped glue their act together.
11. RICKLE’S BOOK
Don Rickles - the last of the great old-time comedians. Brilliant comic and a fun read.
12. DEAN & ME
A loving tribute to Dean Martin by his ex-partner and nemesis, Jerry Lewis.
13. UNLIKELY ANGEL
Written by Ashley Smith, the girl who was held hostage by a murderer and convinced him to surrender after reading to him from “Purpose Driven Life”.
14. NEVER HAVE YOUR DOG STUFFED
Alan Alda’s book, not quite as interesting as I believe him to be.
15. MONSTER
L.A. Gang leader Sanyika Shakur’s memoir. Brutal.
16. ME AND A GUY NAMED ELVIS
Great read, written by one of Elvis’s closest friends.
17. WASHED BY BLOOD
The story of the conversion of Brian “Head” Welch, former guitarist with rock supergroup Korn.
18. HERE’S JOHNNY
Ed McMahon’s tribute to his old boss, Johnny Carson.
19. BIRD- THE LEGEND OF CHARLIE PARKER
The tragic story of one of the all-time great jazz musicians.
20. MY ANECDOTAL LIFE
The autobiography of the great comedic film director, Carl Reiner.
21. MEMOIRS OF A MANGY LOVER
Groucho Marx’s musings. Always enjoyable.
22. BROKEN MUSIC
The somewhat pompous autobiography of rock musician Sting.
23. THE GLASS CASTLE
One of my all-time favorites. I have recommended it to several people. It’s the true story of an NBC reporter who grew up in poverty, thanks to the choices of her selfish, alcoholic parents. Great read.
24. THE WHITE BOOK
The Beatle’s former American manager, Ken Mansfield, tells his story. Fascinating.
25. DANGEROUS SURRENDER
My pastor Rick Warren’s wife Kay wrote this inspiring story of her journey towards AIDS work.
26. MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS
The Dean Martin story, told lovingly by his daughter, Deana. A little hero-worship going on, but she doesn’t hold back on the bad stuff.
27. WITH LOUIS AND THE DUKE
The autobiography of Barney Bigard, clarinetist for Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington.
---------------------------------------------------------
ENTERTAINMENT RELATED NON-BIOS
---------------------------------------------------------
28. LIVE FROM NEW YORK
A history of Saturday Night Live, told by the cast members. Interesting, fun and eye-opening.
29. JAZZ ANECDOTES
One of the books I’ve read several times - great stories by musicians who have lived the jazz life.
30. KISS-BEHIND THE MASK
I got into a brief period of wanting to read about the band that captivated my pre-teen years. This book was the best.
31. SEX, MONEY, KISS
Don’t let the title fool you, it’s not what you think. Mostly its Gene Simmon’s take on promotion and making money. I don’t agree with much of what he says, but he is interesting none-the-less, and sure keeps to his convictions.
32. KISS AND MAKE UP
More of the same.
33. KISS AND SELL
More of the same, focused on marketing of the famous Rock Band, or “Rock Brand” as Gene calls it.
34. RAT PACK CONFIDENTIAL
Frank, Dean, Sammy and the boys. Cooler than humanly possible.
35. HOTTER THAN THAT - THE TRUMPET
A history of the trumpet in American culture. Actually, quite interesting. But then, I’m biased.
36. SONGWRITERS ON SONWRITING
Exactly what the title says. Great insights from great songwriters.
37. MOVING TO HIGHER GROUND
Wynton Marsalis wrote this book on the ‘deepness’ of jazz and its profound importance and effect on our lives and on society.
38. I KILLED
Stories from the road by stand-up comics. More sad than funny.
39. PRACTICING
A book dedicated to the art of practicing your instrument. Very insightful.
40. ROCK STAR BABYLON
Tales from behind the scenes with rock music’s greatest artists.
41. LAUREL CANYON
A history of the L.A. neighborhood where much of 60’s rock and roll was birthed and nurtured.
---------------------------------------------
CARTOON
---------------------------------------------
42. IT’S ONLY A GAME
The only other comic strip done by the creator of Peanuts, Charles Schulz. Never before published!
43. MY HOT DOG WENT OUT, CAN I HAVE ANOTHER?
A collection of Foxtrot comics. Bill Amend’s “Foxtrot” is one of the few cartoon stripss out there that I believe to be in the mold of classics like Peanuts and Calvin & Hobbes.
44. THE REJECTION COLLECTION
Cartoons The New Yorker rejected.
45. THE NEW YORKER 75TH ANNIVERSARY CARTOON COLLECTION
The greatest collection single frame comics, spanning 75 years.
---------------------------------------------
MISC.
---------------------------------------------
46. THE BOOK OF USELESS INFORMATION
Exactly what it sounds like. Good bathroom reading.
47. GREAT AMERICAN ANECTDOTES
A fun book full of random stories from American history - the stuff that happened ‘behind the scenes” of the big events.
48. 1,000 PLACES TO SEE BEFORE YOU DIE
I didn’t read all of it, but its fun to skim through it, especially with the places you’ve been!
49. BLAZE
A Stephen King book written when he was young and using another name. Didn’t finish this one.
50. HUMOR
A collection of jokes on every subject.
51. UNCLE JOHN’S TRIUMPHANT 20TH ANNIVERSARY
My favorite series of books. Everyone should have Uncle John’s Bathroom readers littered throughout the house.
52. UNSINKABLE BATHROOM READER
More of my favorite books series.
53. GOLDEN PLUNGER AWARDS
Stupid stories about stupid people.
54. THE PESSIMIST’S GUIDE TO HISTORY
All the negative stories from history, going all the way back to the Big Bang!
55. EINSTEIN’S REFRIGERATOR
Weird but true “urban legends” from American history.
55. 1968
Time Magazine’s tribute to the pivotal year.
56. TREASURY OF WIT & WISDOM
Reader’s Digest’s compilation of quotes from various notables on various topics.
57. THE MEANING OF LIFE
Esquire Magazine asked many celebrities what the meaning of life was. I don’t think I agreed with any of them.

Satchmo Night  

Posted by Tony Guerrero



Last night was kind of a new treat for me. After displaying my Louis Armstrong collection at the Norman P Murray Center throughout February, we presented a free showing of the documentary "The Wonderful World Of Louis Armtsrong". It was so great to be able to spend an evening sharing the music of this legendary figure. Most people don't even know how important he was to American music - I can guarantee you, without reservation, that no matter what music you listen to - from jazz to rock to techno - his influence is prevalent.

I'm not good at guessing crowd sizes, but maybe 150 came out, from teenagers to people in their 90s. I spoke for about ten minutes and then we watched the documentary (which brought several people to tears) and I closed the night with some Q&A and by playing a song live.

It was cool to see the people who came out. Many people from the community whom I've never met but who share an appreciation for Armstrong (a couple people even brought their own memorabilia to share!); some friends from Saddleback Church were there; and a couple friends I haven't seen in many years - Jayne Osborne, who I'm not sure I've seen since high school in '84, and Mark Divers, who I haven't seen since probably the late 80s. Mark is a wonderful trombone player and because he let me know ahead of time that he was coming, I asked him to bring his horn, and he got up to play with me. So much fun.

Louis Armstrong died in 1971...amazing how much joy he still brings.

(My display is still up through the second week of March. You can also see it online at my website. Click HERE, then click on "Satchmo")

Candice's Blog  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


After a year of "I don't get why you're spending all that time blogging and reading other people's blogs...", my wife Candice finally has her own blog. Check it out HERE

(4.5 years married, and I finally win one!)

Gerry Niewood  

Posted by Tony Guerrero



If you know anything about my musical life, you know I was largely influenced by famed flugelhornist Chuck Mangione. This isn't a blog about him, though, but about his saxophonist, Gerry Niewood, who played on many of Chuck's early landmark records and rejoined him on tours over the last few years.

Gerry died on Continental Flight 3407 yesterday, as did Chuck's guitarist Coleman Mellett.

While I occasionally get to perform with several Mangione musicians from years past (including two of his current musicians, Dave Tull and Kevin Axt, who, thankfully, were not on that flight), I never met Gerry or heard him play live. But, oh, the hours I spent listening to his recordings. I know those solos by heart. He was amazing.

Most musicians dream of leaving a musical legacy behind. When we die, we hope people would continue to listen to what we played. So, since you're here, please take a minute to honor him by watching this video of Gerry playing live with Chuck in the early 1970's. He plays a great solo starting at the 1-minute mark, for about 2-1/2 minutes.

Rest in Peace, thank you for the music.

Rain  

Posted by Tony Guerrero

It's been raining a lot lately...and I bet you haven't seen this in a long time...
You're welcome.

The Louis Armstrong Collection  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


Hope you'll come check this out:

"In celebration of Black History Month, The Norman P. Murray Community Center
in Mission Viejo has installed a gallery featuring Tony Guerrero's personal
collection of Louis Armstrong Memorabilia. The display will be open to the
public for the entire month of February. Stop by any time during regular
operating hours to view items from Armstrong's storied career, including
autographed records, concert programs, his personal handkerchief, and much,
much more.

Also at the center, on Friday, February 27, at 7:00pm, Tony will host a FREE
screening of "Satchmo", a documentary on the life of Louis "Satchmo"
Armstrong.

Be sure to stop by this month and examine the life of the man considered to
be the singularly most important figure in American music.

The Norman P. Murray Community Center is at 24932 Veteran’s Way, Mission Viejo.
For more information, call 949-470-8452."

My niece is funny.  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


This is my niece Alina. She came over today to play with Ella.

She took a little Princess dress and placed it over another Princess dress.

I said, "Oh, good, you put the dress on the dress. Maybe you should put the shoes on the shoes and let the pony ride the pony."

She said, "Maybe Uncle Tony should say 'shh' to Uncle Tony."

I love sarcastic kids.

P.S. She is starring in Jackie Chan's new movie. Read part of his blog about her HERE.
(Bet she didn't tell him to 'shh'...)

Happy Birthday, Princess!  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


Ella is three years old today...or as she likes to say "I'm free!"

Final Freddie Post - Free Song Download!  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


After Freddie Hubbard's death (see previous blogs), some musician friends and I decided to record his classic song "Little Sunflower" as our own little tribute to him, just to give away. So, here it is. Click the link to download it, then toss it on your ipod or computer, and whenever it randomly gets played, think of Freddie. (While you're at it, go to iTunes and buy some of his music...the real thing is way better!) Click here for your free mp3 of "Little Sunflower":
http://snipr.com/anhg3-nuvm5y

Tony Guerrero - Flugelhorn & Drum programming
Greg Vail - Flute
Gannin Arnold - Guitar
Tom Zink - Keys
Melvin Davis - Bass

One for the band geeks...  

Posted by Tony Guerrero



I've often joked that I don't mind when my things get damaged or stolen, because it means I get to buy new things! Everything's replaceable, right? Not so, it turns out.

I was reminded by my friend Kurt Witt at Yamaha instruments that my trumpet, from the very in-demand Xeno YTR8335RG line of Yamaha Professional Series Trumpets, is the ONLY one ever manufactured in the brass color. Every other one is silver, like the picture.

So, hands off my trumpet.

Ole  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


Today I heard my daughter counting to eight in Spanish.

Thanks, Dora.

Proud of my Pastor & Country  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


Yesterday, I was very proud to see my pastor take the podium at the inauguration. Seeing someone you know in an international moment is indeed a strange experience! The picture above was taken as the staff of Saddleback Church - his staff - gathered to watch him.

While I'm at it, you know I didn't vote for Obama, but yesterday I was also proud of him. The racial barrier is, of course, a landmark, and I cannot help but admire the man who broke that barrier. But he has also handled this transition with dignity and humility. Of course, his performance on the job remains to be seen, but I have committed to pray for this president and to support him as I can, AND to oppose him in the areas I feel strongly about. That's my responsibility - and yours.

And I was proud of our country yesterday. I was reminded of just what a great country we live in. A peaceful transition of power - do you realize just how horrible power struggles are in other parts of the world? That God has allowed me to live in this country will not be lost on me.

Finally, I am proud of our ex-President. More so, I am grateful. He has kept us safe for these last eight years since 9/11. I wish more Americans recognized him for this. What a shame. He has every right to leave the office bitter at the ungrateful American people, but instead chose to offer one of the most notably courteous transitions on record. He has had nothing but praise and support for the new President.

My favorite line of the day was Obama's statement to terrorists: "Your people will judge you by what you build, not by what you tear down”. Awesome.

Okay, on we go to this next season of history!

UPDATE TO LAST POST  

Posted by Tony Guerrero

After I wrote my last blog, I thought "Why not share my fan moment with the man himself?", so I felt compelled to drop Gene a little email via his website, just for kicks. I figured that since our Starbucks meeting was so brief, I might as well tell him why it was meaningful to me. So, the topper of the story - he posted my letter on his website and thanked me yet again!
(Yes, I am a dork.)

Click on this picture to see it:

That's right...I bought Gene Simmons coffee.  

Posted by Tony Guerrero



I went to the NAMM show today - its the annual convention where all the musical instrument manufacturers go to show their new product lines. Zillions of music celebs attend. Maybe I'll blog about it later.

But for now, just know that today, I bought "The God Of Thunder" a decaf coffee and a scone at Starbucks.

How big of a deal is that? When I was a kid, KISS were like super heros to me and my friends. I owned all their records. My room was covered in KISS posters. I was at their "KISS Alive II" concert in 1977. My first band played KISS songs. I dressed as them for more than one Halloween (see pic below).

I am a musician today largely because they made me want to be a rock star when I was a kid.

And today, I stood in line with and bought coffee and a scone for Gene Simmons.
He shook my hand and thanked me, twice. Cool.


<-----Me as KISS drummer Peter Criss in 1978.

On my way outta here...  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


I had to fill out a survey today. In the age category, I noticed that out of the six circle choices, my selection was past the midway marker. I am, officially, "over the hill" and am, apparently, on the downward slope. I'd better make the most of my last two circles!

Snow Man, meet Man In the Moon. Man in the Moon, meet Snow Man  

Posted by Tony Guerrero





We took the kids to Big Bear for their first snow trip yesterday. Our daughter refused to wear gloves, and almost refused her jacket (well, she did, but we forced it on her!) but she did get to build her first snow man (pictured).

Also, driving down the mountain, we were awestruck by an amazing moon at dusk, not at all aware that it was the closest to earth it will be for at least another 26 years! Here's some cool shots just taken from the car window...

A nice way to spend a Saturday.

Another Freddie Post  

Posted by Tony Guerrero





Hubert Laws & Stevie Wonder


Herbie Hancock










Yesterday, I was honored to be among the 300 or so mourners at Freddie Hubbard's funeral. To be there as so many living jazz legends paid tribute to another who has passed…well, it will not be forgotten by me anytime soon.

There were, among the crowd, many known musicians with whom I've had the honor of sharing the stage and got to reconnect with, and several I didn't know personally but of whom I've been a long time admirer. Among the attenders, speakers and performers were Herbie Hancock, Stevie Wonder, Bennie Maupin, Stanley Clarke, George Duke, Marcus Miller, Christian McBride, Patrice Rushen and many more. Hearing Stevie Wonder play Freddie's tune "Little Sunflower" on harmonica was a highlight.

There were several moments I wanted to grab my phone and take a video or photo, but ultimately, I was there to honor Freddie - not just as a jazz fan, but as someone who was a recipient of his personal kindness and generosity, and I felt those memories would be more significant to me tucked away in my head rather than on a cheesy cell-phone video. (The pictures above are from the press.)

The pastor ended with a wonderful message about the significance of the trumpet in Scripture. Blowing the trumpet was always a call to something - to gather the people, to prepare for battle. And so many people around the world were touched over the last five decades because this one man knew how to 'blow the trumpet'. As the preacher said - "Gabriel, get ready for Freddie…you have a new lead trumpet player on his way!"

Blow the trumpet, Freddie. You were the greatest.

Lyrics  

Posted by Tony Guerrero

GOOD LYRICS:
Daddy’s just like Coltrane
Baby’s just like Miles
Lady’s just like Ella
When she smiles…
(“Lady Wants to Know” by Michael Franks)

BAD LYRICS:
She's a dancer
A romancer
She's a Capricorn
And I'm a Cancer
("C'Mon And Love Me" by KISS)

(So, why do I have the KISS album in my collection and not the Michael Franks album?!? Yep, I'm a little embarrassed.)

I love good lyrics, but, man, they are hard to come by. Lyrics are always a challenge as I write songs, but I love coming across a great lyric, whether I write it or someone else does.

This blog was prompted by a song I heard last night that really moved me, both musically and lyrically. It was written by Clint Eastwood with his son Kyle and is the closing theme to the movie "Gran Torino" (a GREAT movie to check out, but sit through the closing credits because this song will mean much more).

The song is sung by Jamie Cullum, although the first part is Clint singing (which makes more sense in the movie).

Click and play this YouTube video of the song, then read along the lyrics below. Beautiful.

[Side Note: My Clint Eastwood connection...Clint once brought his son Kyle, now a very established jazz bassist, in to the Baked Potato Jazz Club in No Hollywood to hear my band. Later, when Clint's L.A. home was converted into an office, my manager had her office in it.]



THEME FROM GRAN TORINO

[*Sung By Clint Eastwood*]
So tenderly your story is
nothing more than what you see
or what you've done or will become
standing strong do you belong
in your skin; just wondering

gentle now the tender breeze blows
whispers through my Gran Torino
whistling another tired song

engine hums and bitter dreams grow
heart locked in a Gran Torino
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long

[*sung by Jamie Cullum*]
Realign all the stars above my head
Warning signs travel far
I drink instead on my own Oh! how I've known
the battle scars and worn out beds

gentle now a tender breeze blows
whispers through a Gran Torino
whistling another tired song

engines hum and bitter dreams grow
heart locked in a Gran Torino
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long

these streets are old they shine
with the things I've known
and breaks through the trees
their sparkling

your world is nothing more than all the tiny things you've left behind

So tenderly your story is
nothing more than what you see
or what you've done or will become
standing strong do you belong
in your skin; just wondering

gentle now a tender breeze blows
whispers through the Gran Torino
whistling another tired song
engines hum and bitter dreams grow
a heart locked in a Gran Torino
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long

may I be so bold and stay
I need someone to hold
that shudders my skin
their sparkling

your world is nothing more than all the tiny things you've left behind

so realign all the stars above my head
warning signs travel far
i drink instead on my own oh how ive known
the battle scars and worn out beds

gentle now a tender breeze blows
whispers through the Gran Torino
whistling another tired song
engines hum and better dreams grow
heart locked in a Gran Torino
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long
it beats a lonely rhythm all night long

Freddie Hubbard...R.I.P.  

Posted by Tony Guerrero




Freddie Hubbard, a musical hero of mine and the man whom I consider to be the last great innovator of the jazz trumpet as well as someone I had the distinct honor of spending quality one-on-one time with, died this morning.

If you didn't read my previous blog, please do...it details my summer spent in his company. I reposted it HERE and I have also included an audio excerpt of ME actually giving HIM a trumpet lesson (read the story!).

And, while you're here, to help me honor him, take a moment to watch this YouTube clip.
It was impossible to choose just one clip to capture him, so this one is as good as any.
You do not have to know anything about the trumpet or jazz to recognize that this man played with fire and passion. You'll need to watch through his solo - about 3 minutes. (You may recognize the pianist as Herbie Hancock, also the subject of an earlier blog. And you may recognize the tune - these are the guys who recorded it originally in the 60s and were sampled in the 1993 remake hit.)



Rest in peace, Freddie. Thank you for the music and the inspiration, and for your generosity to me.

My Christmas...  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


1. 2 Kids + One Grandma With No Shopping Self-Control = Way Too Many Gifts.
Seriously, where are we gonna store this stuff? And this picture is only one of two van-fulls, not to mention the stuff under the tree. Sheesh.


2. All the grandparents, parents, kids & grand kids together for the first time in...dunno how long.


3. Another action packed year of Christmas services at Saddleback. After all the work, I love hearing the music come from this family of dedicated volunteers, and it sure is a beautiful sight seeing a congregation of people lighting candles and singing about the Savior.



4. For Christmas this year, my gift to my family started as a little weekend project back in October. It turned into a 3-month ordeal, with about an $800 price tag. But worth it. I gathered every old photo from both sides of my family, dating from roughly the 1890s to the 1990s, and had them all scanned. I also found hundreds of undeveloped slides and negatives, mostly from the 1940s-50s-60s and unseen for decades (some never seen!) and had them developed and scanned. And three unseen 8mm films of my family from around 1971. In total, the final discs hold 9,440 photos, spanning both sides of my family over the last century.

I learned so much about my family going through these. For example, my uncles on my mom's side hosted their own radio show in Hollywood in the 1940s, and featured guests like 40s bombshell Jane Russell (that's the first picture above, my Uncle Otto on the left) - how could I have not known that?!? And my great-uncle on my dad's side was a candidate for President of Mexico, but was assasinated by the sitting president?!? (I have pictures of my uncle, but the newspaper above shows my grandmother at the funeral, far left.)

So, now, if the house ever burns down, we don't need to grab the photo albums because they are all preserved on multiple copies, and my family will have them to pass on forever!

(By the way - while I scanned about 1,500 photos myself, the bulk of them were done by www.scanmyphotos.com. They are in Irvine, but also do it through the mail at the crazy low price of $49 per 1,000 photos!)


So, how was your Christmas?

FREE CHRISTMAS CD!  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


A few years back, I recorded a collection of 18 Christmas Carols. Nothing fancy, just flugelhorn and piano, intended to be background music for tree-decorating, present-opening, eggnog-sipping, etc.

Its yours FREE if you want it.
Download it here: http://snipr.com/8xdt6-lsg6td

And the winner is...  

Posted by Tony Guerrero


So, my CD 'Apasionado' was in the preliminary round for the Grammys (in the Contemporary Jazz category), but didn't make the final cut of five albums. (I know, I know...its an honor just to be nominated to be nominated...!)

However, a gospel song I co-wrote with Alva Copeland has just been nominated for "Independent Song Of The year" by Worship Leader Magazine, and YOU can go vote for it!

Just click here:
http://www.worshipleader.com/praise-awards

And tell your friends! (Each computer can only vote once)

Sure, I'd like it to win because it really is song of the year, and not because I flooded the votes, but that's a sacrifice I'm willing to make. :)

I promise - if it wins, free cars for everyone!
(That is, if the prize comes with ten-zillion dollars, otherwise, you'll get my heartfelt thanks.)